Tree Pollens

The Real Troublemakers: Hardwood Deciduous Trees

The real troublemakers are hardwood deciduous trees - oak, elm, birch, maple, ash, alder, and hazel.

These trees generally pollinate from February to April or May. In the South, these trees begin pollinating as early as January; in the North, they begin in April.

Oaks, found everywhere in the United States except Alaska and Hawaii, generally pollinate in February and March in the South and April and May in the Northeast. They tend to bloom one after another, prolonging the period of pollen exposure.

Birch trees, found in the eastern states, often trigger allergies in April and May. In the Northeast, Canada, and Alaska, gray and white birches are common; in the Appalachians and upper Midwest, yellow and sweet birches predominate; and in the Southeast, river birches bloom from March to mid-April.

Alders, found in the eastern United States and Pacific Northwest, produce pollen from February through April, causing allergic reactions in many people.

Elms can also cause problems for allergy sufferers. The American elm, widespread through the East and Midwest, blooms early in February in the South and in March and April in the North. The rock elm, found from the Midwest to the Northeast, blooms in the spring. In the South, the winged elm blooms in the spring and the September elm and cedar elm bloom in the fall.

Cross-Reactive Trees

Junipers, cedars, cypresses, and sequoias are "cross-reactive," meaning if you're allergic to one of these types of trees, you may be allergic to another. In Texas, the abundant mountain cedar causes problems for allergy sufferers. In the far South, junipers bloom in January; the Bermuda juniper blooms in March and April; in western Texas, Arizona, and parts of California, the Pinchot juniper blooms from September through November. Box elders are the only members of the maple family known to cause allergy problems. Commonly found in the Midwest, these trees bloom in January and February in the South and in April and May in the Northeast and Midwest.

Other tree allergens

Sycamores, found throughout the eastern states, also can cause allergic reactions. They are often used as ornamental trees in cities. A western sycamore, found in California and Arizona, blooms 2-3 weeks in April or May. Sweet fern, bayberry, Australian pine, olive, paper mulberry, hedge plant, hackleberry, sugarberry, hornbeam, hop-hornbeam, hazel, pecan, walnut, hickory, sweetgum, witch hazel, mesquite, acacia can also cause reaction.

Non-Allergens

The highly visible yellow pollen from pine trees - including spruce, fir, hemlock, larch, and the true cedars - rarely triggers allergies. Although pine trees generate clouds of pollen, they do not usually trigger your sneezing and runny nose. Likewise, fruit-bearing trees, which depend on insects for pollination, almost never create an allergic response. These pollens tend to be heavy, sticky, and less numerous. Willows and poplars are also seldom the cause of allergy symptoms. Many ornamental poplars produce no pollen, making them ideal for people who suffer from allergies.

Other allergens: Weeds and grasses.

CLARINEX, a prescription medication, treats year-round allergy symptoms and ongoing hives of unknown cause, in adults and children 6 months and older, and seasonal allergy symptoms in patients 2 years and older. CLARINEX 5 mg Tablets and 5 mg RediTabs Tablets are approved for patients 12 years and older; CLARINEX 2.5 mg RediTabs Tablets are approved for patients 6 to 11 years; CLARINEX Syrup is approved for patients 6 months and older.

Twice-daily CLARINEX-D 12 HOUR Extended Release Tablets and once-daily CLARINEX-D 24 HOUR Extended Release Tablets treat the symptoms of seasonal allergies, including nasal congestion, in patients 12 years and older.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT CLARINEX

CLARINEX Tablets side effects in patients 12 years and older were similar to placebo and included sore throat, dry mouth, and fatigue for seasonal and year-round allergy patients, and headache, nausea, and fatigue for patients with ongoing hives of unknown cause.

CLARINEX Syrup side effects in children 6 to 11 years were similar to placebo. For children 6 months to 5 years, syrup side effects varied by age and included fever, diarrhea, upper respiratory infection, irritability, and coughing.

Due to their pseudoephedrine component, CLARINEX-D 12 HOUR Extended Release Tablets and CLARINEX-D 24 HOUR Extended Release Tablets may cause insomnia (unable to sleep), dizziness, tremor, or irregular heartbeat.

CLARINEX-D 12 HOUR Extended Release Tablets and CLARINEX-D 24 HOUR Extended Release Tablets should not be taken by patients with narrow-angle glaucoma (abnormally high eye pressure), difficulty urinating, severe high blood pressure, or severe heart disease, or by patients who have taken a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor within the past fourteen (14) days.

Patients with diabetes; increased intraocular pressure (eye pressure); thyroid, liver or kidney problems; or enlarged prostate should check with their healthcare provider before taking CLARINEX-D 12 HOUR Extended Release Tablets or CLARINEX-D 24 HOUR Extended Release Tablets.

CLARINEX-D 12 HOUR Extended Release Tablets and CLARINEX-D 24 HOUR Extended Release Tablets should not be taken with other antihistamines and/or decongestants.

The most commonly reported adverse events for CLARINEX-D 12 HOUR Extended Release Tablets were insomnia (unable to sleep), headache, dry mouth, tiredness, sore throat, dizziness, sleepiness, nausea, and loss of appetite.

The most commonly reported adverse events for CLARINEX-D 24 HOUR Extended Release Tablets were dry mouth, headache, insomnia (unable to sleep), sleepiness, sore throat, tiredness, nausea, dizziness, nervousness, restlessness, and poor appetite.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Click here for important CLARINEX Tablets/Syrup/RediTabs Product Information.
Click here for important CLARINEX-D 12 HOUR Product Information.
Click here for important CLARINEX-D 24 HOUR Product Information.

Note: The information on this site is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. If you have any questions about your treatment or medical condition, please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider. This site is intended for use by U.S. residents.

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